Summation of Debates as Election Day Nears

The Presidential election is just around the corner but between the texts, ads, and commercials, you already knew that right?

For many, navigating the presidential elections can be a confusing time, and the presidential debate is meant to be a moment when voters can hear the side of each candidate and decide whose policies they prefer. The first presidential debate was more akin to a boxing match, in which Trump interrupted Biden 57 times, and Biden interrupted Trump 29 times. Additionally, Trump also argued with the moderator 25 times. These interruptions and speaking over one another certainly can only make it harder for an already confused voter to make their choice on the next leader of our nation.

As if the structure of the debate being poorly executed wasn’t enough, there were significant claims made that stretched the truth or simply were just not based on facts made by both sides. According to Factchecking.org Trump made notable exaggerations or “mangled facts” in around 14 instances and Biden has done the same around 6 times. 

Some major points fluffed by Trump included citing instances that have not been proven to be evidence of voter fraud as examples of it, stating that “bad things are happening in Philadelphia, due to his poll watchers not being able to watch people vote at satellite locations in which they have no right to do, and falsely claiming that in 1994 Biden called Blacks “Super-predators” when that is a quote from Hilary Clinton.

Though Biden has done this significantly less there still are points that he made that aren’t entirely factual such as claiming that there was less violence when he was in office, when under trump the violent crime rate has dropped, claiming that Amy Coney Barrett wrote that the Affordable Cares Act was unconstitutional, “though she faulted a 2012 opinion upholding the law.” according to Factchecking.org, and claiming that early in the coronavirus pandemic Trump didn’t send experts to China, when in fact he did.

Following the Presidential Debate was the Vice Presidential Debate, which was much more respectful and tame. Though tamer, Pence still interrupted Harris twice as much as she did him. Both of the Democrats responses to the other party’s interruptions have been immortalized in the form of memes as “Will you shut up, man?” and “Mr. Vice president I’m speaking” took over Twitter immediately. 

Presidential debate two was set to be virtual due to Trump’s positive Covid Status but was canceled shortly after due to the President’s refusal to participate. In place, there were two separate town halls on Oct 15. 

Biden’s Townhall took place in Philadelphia and ran for considerably longer Than Trump’s who’s ran for just an hour in Miami. The First 20 Minutes of Trump’s town hall was spent going back and forth about his Covid diagnosis and whether or not he had tested the day of the first debate. The question remains unanswered.

The candidates being separate allowed for questions to be answered more thoroughly and without interruption allowing viewers to get something from the events. What can viewers expect from the next and last presidential debate on Oct. 22? 

Philly’s very own Kristen Welker will be moderating the event and will have more control in this event than Chris Wallace was allowed. The Commission on Presidential Debates released a statement that stated  “Last night’s debate made clear that additional structure should be added to the format of the remaining debates to ensure a more orderly discussion of the issues.”

This alone will allow viewers who remain undecided and have yet to vote to glean something from the event.

Welker’s topics for the debate are fighting Covid-19, American families, race in America, Climate Change, National security, and Leadership.

Tune in on Thursday, Oct. 22 at 9 pm ET to see what one of our future leaders has to say.

About the author

Bree Brown
Editor-in-chief | + posts

Bree began writing for the paper last fall, moving on to the Editorial team spring of 2020. This is her second go-around at education, as she went to acting school right out of high school. Though she still has a place in her heart for acting she found that something else was calling her. After working on a cruise ship in Hawaii she decided to come back to her hometown and study English. She is an English and Creative Writing major. She plans to finish her degree and teach English overseas before deciding on a longer-term career.

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