In Fashion Lions: Khadija Oyefusi

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In Fashion Lions: Khadija Oyefusi

Jasmine “J’Ro” Rozario, Contributing Writer

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Khadija Oyefusi is a soft-spoken powerhouse. The student, part chemistry
student, part president of the cosmetology club, she is a great example of how
STEM majors and “feminine hobbies” aren’t at odds, but can work together to
create a cool, unique, and fashionable campus experience. I asked Oyefusi to tell

me about her love of fashion and beauty interactions with her campus experi-
ence.

J: Does fashion get in the way of your school schedule?

K: It definitely does. A full face of makeup does not take ten minutes. You’re go-
ing to have to make the sacrifices like going to bed early and waking up late just

to remove the makeup. But to me, it’s not a burden because it is something that I
like to do so I make the time for it while also making time for my schoolwork.
J: If you could make your beauty routine more functional what would you do?
K: My go to everyday is a fresh face with lashes. If I’m trying to be professional
but also relaxed my go to is a nice pair of pointed flats.
J: On October 10th, Khadijah will be hosting a women’s health and hygiene
seminar. She believes that the first part of beauty is taking care of yourself. Her
philosophy is “if you look good, you feel good!” Make sure to say “hello” to her
whenever she is on campus and learn more about the cosmetology club. How
does fashion relate to your presence on campus?
K: For me, fashion is really a feeling so if I’m feeling “bummy” or “unhappy”, I
feel it will reflect itself in what I wear. If I’m feeling happy and like myself, I’ll
dress up a little more. It’s more of an expression and people can tell how I feel
just by the way I dress.
J: Would you say dressing up for school empowers you?

K: Dressing a certain way shows people who you are. If you dress with confi-
dence and exude confidence within yourself, people tend to view you as a leader.

That goes for shoes too. When wearing heels, I feel more powerful. If I’m wear-
ing sneakers, I feel like a bum.

J: How does this relate to your career path?
K: Right now, I am the president of the cosmetology club [located in S1-12].
Beauty is just a hobby for me. I’m not a painter or musician, so this is how I
choose to express myself and it’s an artform. This is what I want to portray
through my club, the ability for people to be themselves, both men and women
alike, and I’d like to take these principles into my career as a chemist as well.

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